“For me everything on the tour was great, better than I was
expecting …  The biking in the alps could not have been better,
and viewing the tour, what a thrill.  You and Jay, what a great
host and guide…”
 Mark Field Sr.  (BV Alps Tour Guest)

Introducing  BEAUX VOYAGES Alps Tour 2010
Call 1-877-362-0045 for questions/bookings
Image of Col de la Croix de Fer sign
From the desk of Walt Ballenberger, founder, Beaux Voyages, Inc.

Fellow cycling fanatic,
Mark’s quote above is spot-on.  Bike riding in the alps and watching the big
race really is a thrill.  From the music and spectacle of the sponsor’s
“caravan” to the excitement of hearing the hovering helicopters signaling
the approach of the riders and watching them attack the day’s big climb, it’
s a life-long memory experience.  Most serious bike riders have an itch to
see the big race in person in France during July every year at least once in
their lives, just like most serious golfers dream about playing at St. Andrew’
s some day.

WHY NOT MAKE THIS YOUR YEAR?

Here’s what our Alps Tour 2010 looks like:

Day 1-
The group will get together at the Grenoble train station (we’ll tell you how to
get there).  We have about an hour drive before reaching our home for the
next two nights in Les 2 Alpes.  As the name suggests, the town is nestled
between two alps and is a bustling ski resort in the winter.  In the summer it
is home to some of the most famous climbs in cycling.  You will conquer
one of them even today: The celebrated Alpe d’Huez.  Its legendary 21
switchbacks, with famous bike riders memorialized at each turn, are
something you’ll be telling your friends and family about for years.  The
climb is only 12.8km, but it’s guaranteed to be the most grueling 12.8 km
you have ever done.  OK, Lance Armstrong did it in about 38 minutes in a
time trial a few years ago, but if you can come close to the one hour mark,
consider yourself a really strong rider.  Most mere mortals, yours truly
included, take more like 2 hours.  But regardless of your time, once you
reach the top and look down at the panorama below, it’s a great feeling to
know that “I climbed Alpe d’Huez”.  You can even buy a tee shirt in a local
shop that you can wear to celebrate the accomplishment.  Think anyone
might ask “Did you really do that”?

Tonight we’ll have our first group dinner at our lovely 3 star chalet hotel, the
Souleil’Or.  It’s a cinch you’ll love the succulent French cuisine they serve.

Day 2-
The race is still in the flatlands way to the north, so we’ll take advantage of
another famous climb, perhaps the toughest of all, the Col du Galibier.  
How tough is it?  Well, once you make a speedy descent down Les 2
Alpes, cross the bridge over the lake and see the road tilt upward, you’ll be
climbing for about 20 miles.  
When you approach the top you
will look down to the left or right
and see glaciers below you.  
Your first milestone, about half-
way up, is the Col du Lautaret.  
This is a good place to stop and
have a drink or snack before the
biggest challenge of the day.  
The second half of the climb is
the toughest and you’ll need all
the energy you can muster to
make it the last quarter mile to
the top, where the grade gets to
12% (see photo). When you
reach the top, get a photo of yourself there at the sign, as guest Jim
Musto did with his daughter (she of course road up in the support
vehicle).  If that isn’t office wall material, what is?  You’ll never forget the
feeling of being perched on top of the world with a 360 degree view of
mountains, valleys, and glaciers.  If you can make it up the Galibier, you
can climb any mountain.

Now comes the fun part- you can coast downhill for 20 miles!  After that
well-earned treat we’ll stop and watch the finish of the day’s stage in
one of our favorite watering holes.  You can either shuttle back up the
mountain to the hotel, or like some suicidal guests you can cycle up the
10 switchbacks that lead to Les 2 Alpes.  This climb has also been a
tour finish in years past.
Image of group at Galibier
You read it right folks, 12% grade
Day 3-
We haven’t seen
the race in person
yet, but today we
put ourselves in
position to see the
big mountain top
finish tomorrow.  
We head north and
take a 3 hour drive
to our next stop in
Sixt Fer-A-Cheval.
From here we’ll
have access to the
two big cols the
riders will negotiate
tomorrow, their first day into the Alps this year.  Today we recommend you
tackle the Col de la Ramez, which rises to 1615 meters and is the second
–to-last climb of the day tomorrow.  Don’t fret, tomorrow you will climb
toward Morzine-Avoriez and watch the riders struggle to the finish.  You’ll
be doing the Col de la Ramez in the opposite direction from the race
riders, but if time and energy permit, you can descend a bit and see what
the riders will be facing just before reaching the top.
 

Before returning to our quaint 2 star hotel we’ll stop once again and watch
the finish of the day’s stage on TV at a local tavern.  Another great French
meal is on tap before the big day tomorrow.

Day 4-
Today we’ll be in the thick of the action.  Luckily (or was that good
planning?) our hotel is located in a position to get you there.  We’ll get as
close to the tour arrival road as possible, but that’s always tricky because
the police and French gendarmes close the roads before the big race.  
But we understand that and we’ll send you off on your bike toward Morzine
and the uphill finish.  Climb as far as you wish and find yourself a good
viewing spot for the caravan and then the race itself.  You’ll see the top
professional cyclists in the world passing just in front of you, only inches or
feet away.  You’ll see them straining and unloading all the power they can
muster from within themselves- and then reach for still a little more.  This
is what bike racing at the highest level is all about, and this is why these
guys are the best in the world.  

You won’t forget this day.  Another great dinner- anybody having fun yet?

Day 5-
Today is a rest day for the pro riders, and we’re off to our next oasis- to
be in perfect position to watch them tomorrow over the day’s final climb-
the legendary Col de la Madeleine.  But as with day 3 we’ll tackle the
second-to-last climb of tomorrow’s race first, once again in the opposite
direction the riders will go.  This is the tortuous Col de Saises, rising to
1633 meters.  But first it’s a drive of an hour and a half to     , near
Albertville, a town famous for the winter Olympics.  The program will be
like day 3.  First you’ll tackle the Col de Saises, and then head back to
our hotel, a cute little French manoir (manor house- our group has the
entire hotel).  Another well-earned French dinner awaits.

Day 6-
Today is a big day in the alps, and once again you’ll be right in the middle
of the major action.  You’ll head straight out from our hotel and tackle
another of cycling’s legendary climbs, the Col de la Madeleine.  This
monster rises to 2000 meters and will be the last climb of today’s race
before a downhill dash and finish in St. Jean de Maurienne.  The best tour
viewing is on a climb, and this one is a classic.  Find yourself a good
viewing spot and try to grab some freebies from the caravan.  Once again
you’ll know the riders are coming when the caravan clears and you hear
the sound of whirring helicopters and see them hovering below you.  The
lead cars will be flashing their headlights, and the police escort will be
blowing horns and clearing a path through the crowds of people so the
riders can pass.  Once again you’ll see the strongest climbers and top
teams in the world pass in front of you, inches away.  If you don’t know the
thrill of being at the biggest bike race in the world by now, you never will.

Day 7-
But it’s not over.  Before heading off to the train station in Chambery to
bid our final adieu, we’ll be at the start for today’s race.  Being at the start
of a stage is a unique experience.  This is where you see the pomp and
circumstance.  Get a close up look at the riders as they descend from
their daily strategy meeting on the team busses and get on their bikes-
knowing they have a monstrous stage of 179km in front of them.  If you are
lucky, you might even get an autograph or two.  From there watch the
ceremonial peleton parade through the town before a brief stop at the
start line and the blast of the starting gun.  And off goes another day on
the tour.  At this point the action is over for us except for following the race
on TV.  We head directly to the train station in Chambery.  If you are going
to Paris you will want to book the      train.  Once again, we’ll show you
how to book your train tickets.

THAT’S A GREAT ITINERARY AND A MIND-BOGGLING BIKE
TOUR EXPERIENCE… BUT THERE’S MORE!

WE HAVE SOME GREAT BONUSES AS WELL!

- MEET PERSONALLY WITH FRANKIE ANDREU































- IN CASE YOU'LL NEED A LITTLE HELP WITH TRAINING

before coming on our tour,
we’ll send you a free copy of the well-known
book: "The Cyclist's Training Bible
".

- YOU'LL HAVE 3 LIVE RACE VIEWINGS IN THE ALPS.

- YOU'LL STAY AT CHARMING 2 AND 3 STAR FRENCH
HOTELS AND INNS
, and you can expect excellent French dining.  
Breakfasts are also included, and although lunches are not included in the
price, we sometimes offer a big fresh baguette sandwich for hungry riders
along the road.

- WE OFFER THE BEST VALUE PACKAGE of any tour going to
the big race in France in July.  Go ahead and check it out (you probably
already have).  We are quite frankly a small company, and we plan to stay
that way.  We have always held to our original idea that we would lead our
tours ourselves,
and we won’t rely on outsiders just looking for something
fun to do in the summer.  In other words people who don’t care about our
tours as much as we do.
 As a result of being small our overhead is very
low…
and we pass those savings along to you.  Dollar for dollar
your best value is with Beaux Voyages.

Sure, you can pay another thousand dollars, or two or three or even
$4,000.00 and more
.  That might even buy you a little fancier hotel room
(or maybe not), but you might as well be flushing that money down the you-
know-what.
 It won’t buy you a better experience.

AND FOR THE 2010 RACE WE HAVE A GREAT EARLY BIRD
OFFER.

Put a FULLY REFUNDABLE* $1,000 deposit down to reserve your
slot BEFORE THE END OF 2009 AND GET A 10% DISCOUNT.  

That’s a savings of hundreds, and it will more than pay for bringing your
bike (see below).  We’re making this special offer because it’s to our
advantage to have as many firm bookings lined up as early as possible.

SO THE TIME TO ACT IS NOW.  Call 1-877-362-0045 TOLL
FREE
and book your slot RIGHT AWAY to take advantage of all we’re
offering and the EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT ON TOP OF THAT.

Imagine the stories you’ll have for your friends and family after
that great experience.

And you have our PERSONAL GUARANTEE that you’ll have the best
possible experience.  Look, we’ve done this before and we have a
reputation to uphold.  We know what we’re doing and we can’t afford for
people to be disappointed.

So, if all this sounds great,
THERE IS A WORD OF CAUTION- In order
to be nimble and better serve our guests, we’ve found through experience
that it’s best to have small groups at the big race in France.  That way we
can get people to the right spots at the right time to really experience the
magic.

SO WE ONLY HAVE SLOTS FOR 12 PEOPLE ON EACH
TOUR- TOTAL

Once we reach that number we won’t be in a position to book anyone
else.  (Empty hotel rooms will be ancient history by then in any case).

So if you want to take a chance and wait, that’s fine,
but if you’re really
serious about cycling, serious about seeing Lance Armstrong go for it
with his new Radio Shack team, perhaps for the last time, serious about
having the greatest and most memorable cycling experience anyone
could possibly have in his or her lifetime,
then CALL TOLL FREE 877-
362-0045  AND BOOK YOUR SPOT NOW.

You’re probably saying to yourself “Sounds great- but what
kind of bike will I be riding”?

There are several options:

If you are a serious cyclist and have a really good bike, bringing that
would be your first option.  Sure, it’s a pain to haul a bike around in a big
travel case, but this is a once-in-a-lifetime experience for most people.  
You’ll get the most out of it if you have your own bike.  We’ll help you with
info about how to get your bike to France.  
There are some extra costs on planes and maybe trains, but it’s not too
much.

If toting your bike around just isn’t in the cards, we can provide a bike for
you for 175 euros ($225US) for the duration of the tour.   We’ll get the
highest level rental road bike available, but remember that very high-end
bikes are not usually used as rentals.  It will be a very good bike, however,
but if you’re used to a great bike, it will probably be a step down, to be
honest.

So give a second thought to bringing your own bike.  We want everyone
to be happy with their bikes, and this is the best way to assure that you
are.

Look, if you’ve been thinking for years that “Someday I’d like to go to
France and see the big race in person”, maybe you should poke yourself
and get serious this year.

Think about it- how many more times will Lance Armstrong have a real
legitimate shot to win?
 After the race in 2010 he’ll be almost 40.  There
are one or two guys at that age still left in the peleton, but there aren’t
many and they’re not serious contenders.

The perfect time to do this is NOW.  Lance has a new American team
working for him to win.  Last year he didn’t have his full customary training
schedule when he decided to make a comeback, and he had been out of
competition for 3 years.  He even got injured on top of that which slowed
him down considerably in prime training time.  And there was a lot of
other distracting controversy on his team.  Yet he still managed a podium
finish.

This year it’s different.  He has his own team and will have the training.  If
you want to be a part of this, give yourself an early Christmas or birthday
present (or two).
 Call 1-877-362-0045 and RESERVE YOUR
SLOT NOW.

And Here's Another (Unfortunate) Consideration:
Have you noticed what has happened to the US dollar in the past few
years?  It has dropped like a rock, and many experts predict more of the
same.  So if you're putting your once-in-a-lifetime tour trip off until next
year or beyond
IT WILL COST YOU MORE.  Another reason to stop
delaying and book this magical dream trip NOW.

YOU KNOW YOU WILL NEVER REGRET IT.

OK, SOUNDS GREAT, BUT HOW MUCH DOES ALL THIS COST?

If you've read this far you're probably aware of the cost of taking a trip
to see the biggest cycling event in the world is pretty high.  We invite you
to compare our prices with others in the industry.  

YOUR PRICE FOR THIS FABULOUS ALPS TOUR EXPERIENCE IS
$3,695 PER PERSON  DOUBLE OCCUPANCY
($500 single
supplement- we'll try to let you room with another guest on the tour if
desired and if possible to avoid the single supplement).

Included:
- Accommodations in 2 and 3 star hotels.
- All breakfasts and dinners as indicated on specific tour itineraries,
excellent French dining.
- Support vehicle which sweeps the daily routes, provides snacks, picks
up daily purchases, offers a lift to the weary.
- All transfers from rendezvous point to final drop-off.
- All gratuities for hotels and included meals.
- Group meeting with Versus TV commentator, 9-time TdF finisher and
many-time Lance Armstrong teamate Frankie Andreu. Ask him any
question about pro cycling in general and/or the 2010 race.
- Knowledgeable, bilingual, American guides who know how to offer a
great tour experience.
- Intimate small group atmosphere- Maximum 12 people.
- Cycling nutrition bars and snacks, etc.
- View stage finishes on TV when we are not viewing in person.
- Bonuses as described above.

Not Included:
- Lunches and beverages at all meals
- Flights from North America to Europe and return.
- Train tickets to and from rendezvous locations.
- Bike rental.  Bike rental is $225 for the week. Bringing your own bike is
encouraged.
- Travel and other personal insurance (available as an option).  Insurance,
including medical insurance, is the responibility of each guest.
- Orders from supplemental menus

Here's What To Do Next:

Call 877-362-0045 and book your space today!   Only 12 spots
available on each tour!
    

2010 France Pro Cycling  - 2010 Pyrenees Tour -  Beaux Voyages Home

You can also make inquiries at walt@beauxvoyages.com

*Deposit is fully refundable until end of March 2010.  Standard cancellation policies apply.

Beaux Voyages, Inc. reserves the right to change hotels to another of equal level depending
on availability.  Beaux Voyages, Inc. reserves the right to cancel this tour if a sufficient number
of people do not book.    If for some unforeseen reason Mr. Andreu cannot meet with one or
both of our groups, guests will be receive commensorate remuneration. -
As every cycling fan knows, Frankie is a nine-
time tour finisher in France, a long-time
teammate and stalwart for Lance Armstrong
during many of his great wins, and an
commentator for the Versus channel on TV
each year during the big race.

In addition to the above list of
accomplishments, Frankie is a great guy,
and he’ll have amazing insight for you on the
2010 race in particular, and pro cycling in
general.  He knows it all and will answer all
your individual questions.  So start thinking
today about what you’d like to ask a cycling
pro at the tour if you had an hour with him.  

We’ve had Frankie meet with our groups in
past years, and it is always a highlight.  We
are pleased he’s on our team again this year.

- YOU'LL CLIMB THE MOST
LEGENDARY COLS IN CYCLING
- the
ones you’ve heard about for years, including
Alpe d’Huez, the awesome Col du Galibier
and the Col de la Madeleine, the Col de la
Ramaz, the Col de Saises and more
.

- TO GET YOU IN THE PROPER
MOOD
, we’ll send each guest a free copy of
“The Tour”
, a novel about the race which
really captures the spirit and allure of the
event.  It’s a great read.
ABOVE- Cycling personality Frankie Andreu,
member of the Versus Channel Race Commentary
Team.
BELOW- Frankie racing in France along with
Lance Armstrong and USPS team.
Frankie Andreu image